Dr. Monica G.Turner
Department of Zoology
University of Wisconsin
430 Lincoln Dr.
Madison, WI 53706
Ecosystem and
Landscape Ecology Lab
 

Data

Data available for download

Yellowstone Data

  • Prefire heterogeneity, fire severity, and early postfire plant reestablishment in subalpine forests of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. 

    Investigators: Monica G. Turner, William H. Romme, Robert H. Gardner

    Contact(s): Monica G. Turner, Department of Zoology, Birge Hall, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI  53706, 608-262-2592,
    turnermg @ wisc.edu, http://landscape.zoology.wisc.edu/index.html.

    Citation: Turner, M. G., W. H. Romme, and R. H. Gardner.  1999.  Prefire heterogeneity, fire severity and plant reestablishment in subalpine forests of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. International Journal of Wildland Fire 9:21-36. (pdf)

    Abstract: At three sites, 100 sampling points were distributed regularly in a 1-km x 1-km grid and sampled annually from 1989-1992.  Information was recorded on fire severity (damage to trees, depth of ash and soil charring, and percent mineral soil exposed); pre-fire forest structure (forest successional stage; tree density; tree species; tree size; and evidence of pre-fire disturbance by mountain pine beetle [Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopk.] or mistletoe [Arceuthobium americanum Nutt. ex Engelm.]); postfire percent cover of graminoids, forbs, and low shrubs; number of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelm.) seedlings; and general topographic characteristics (slope and aspect).

    Number of Observations: 300

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  • Effects of fire size and pattern on early succession in Yellowstone National Park  

    Investigators: Monica G. Turner, William H. Romme, and Robert H. Gardner

    Contact(s): Monica G. Turner, Department of Zoology, Birge Hall, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI  53706, 608-262-2592,
    turnermg @ wisc.edu, http://landscape.zoology.wisc.edu/index.html.

    Primary Citation: Turner, M. G., W. H. Romme, R. H. Gardner and W. W. Hargrove. 1997. Effects of fire size and pattern on early succession in Yellowstone National Park. Ecological Monographs 67:411-433. (pdf)

    Additional Citations:Turner, M. G., W. H. Romme and D. B. Tinker. 2003. Surprises and lessons from the 1988 Yellowstone fires. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 1:351-358. (pdf)

    Romme W. H., and M. G. Turner. 2004. Ten years after the 1988 Yellowstone fires: is restoration needed?  Pages 318-361 In:  L. L. Wallace, editor.  After the fires: the ecology of change in Yellowstone National Park. Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut. 

    Abstract:The Yellowstone fires of 1988 affected >250,000 ha, creating a mosaic of burn severities across the landscape and providing an ideal opportunity to study effects of fire size and pattern on postfire succession.  We asked whether vegetation responses differed between small and large burned patches within the fire-created mosaic in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) and evaluated the influence of spatial patterning on the postfire vegetation. Vegetation in a small (1 ha), moderate (70-200 ha) and large (500-3600 ha) burned patch at each of three geographic locations was sampled annually from 1990 to 1993 and again in 1996.   

    Number of Observations: 297546

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Wisconsin River Floodplain Data

  • Plot-level variable information for Wisconsin River Floodplain Project.  Relevant for following Wisconsin River Floodplain data sets: canopy trees, shrubs, tree seedlings, birds, soils and denitrification. (Italicized data sets not yet linked for download are in preparation, please check back again).  

    Investigators: Monica G. Turner and Emily Stanley

    Contact(s): Monica G. Turner, Department of Zoology, Birge Hall, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI  53706, 608-262-2592,
    turnermg @ wisc.edu, http://landscape.zoology.wisc.edu/index.html.

    Period of Study: 1999-2001

    Project description :The Wisconsin River Floodplain Project aimed to identify landscape indicators that are well correlated with specific aspects of ecological function is a crucial research need requiring an integrated approach that combines landscape monitoring with field studies. Large river-floodplain systems are among the most diverse and dynamic landscapes in the US, providing many important societal values, but relatively little effort has been devoted to development and testing of landscape indicators for these systems.

    We developed and tested ecological indicators for large river-floodplain landscapes along reaches of the Wisconsin River to determine which landscape metrics are most useful for monitoring population, community and ecosystem processes in large river-floodplain landscapes. Spatially extensive field sampling was combined with landscape analysis in nine reaches of the Wisconsin River sampling to quantify the ability of landscape indicators to predict ecological variables over broad scales. Landscape indicators were evaluated by their utility for detecting changes in the structure and function of the Wisconsin River floodplain landscape that were related to modification of the natural flow regime, historical land use, and current land-use patterns. Our field studies were concentrated in floodplain forest in nine 12 to 20-km reaches along the lower 400 km of the Wisconsin River.

    For more information about this project, including key findings, please visit Dr. Turner's Wisconsin River Floodplain Project page.

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  • Distribution and abundance of canopy trees in floodplain forests of the Wisconsin River

    Principal Investigators:   Monica G. Turner, Sarah E. Gergel, Mark D. Dixon, and James R. Miller

    Contact Information :  Monica G. Turner, Department of Zoology, 432 Birge Hall, University of Wisconsin Madison, WI 53706. 608-262-2592. turnermg@wisc.edu. http://landscape.zoology.wisc.edu/index.html

    Citations :

    Turner, M. G., S. E. Gergel, M. D. Dixon and J. R. Miller. 2004. Distribution and abundance of trees in floodplain forests of the Wisconsin River: environmental influences at different scales. Journal of Vegetation Science 15:729-738. (pdf)

    Turner, M. G., E. H. Stanley, M. Bürgi and D. J. Mladenoff. 2008. Changes in the Wisconsin River and its floodplain. In: D. M. Waller and T. P. Rooney, editors. The vanishing present: ecological change in Wisconsin. University of Chicago Press.

    Abstract: These data were collected in order to investigate how physiography, flooding regime, landscape pattern, land-cover history and local soil conditions influence the presence, community structure and abundance of overstory trees.  An additional research question was “Can broad-scale factors explain variation in floodplain forest community, or are locally measured soil conditions necessary?”.

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